UN Human Rights Committee: Concluding observations on the fourth periodic report of Ireland (19 August 2014) – Religious Oath requirement

Let’s be quite clear our government has known for decades that the continuance of the constitutional requirement for taking a stated religious oath for high office (President, judges of superior courts and membership of Council of State) is an abnegation of human rights.

The UN Human Rights Committee has been calling for urgent action by government to move a constitutional amendment to do the right thing by citizens.

Here is what the latest UN HRC said in its report issued on 19 August last.

UN Human Rights Committee
Concluding observations on the fourth periodic report of Ireland
Freedom of religion

“21. The Committee is concerned at the slow pace of progress in amending the provisions of the Constitution that oblige individuals wishing to take up senior public office positions, such as President, members of the Council of State and members of the judiciary, to take religious oaths. It is also concerned about the slow progress in increasing access to secular education through the establishment of non-denominational schools, divestment of the patronage of schools and the phasing out of integrated religious curricula in schools accommodating minority faith or non-faith children. It expresses further concern that under section 37 (1) of the Employment Equality Acts, religious-owned institutions, including in the fields of education and health, can discriminate against employees or prospective employees to protect the religious ethos of the institution (arts. 2, 18, 25 and 27).
The State party should take concrete steps to amend articles 12, 31 and 34 of the Constitution that require religious oaths to take up senior public office positions, taking into account the Committee’s general comment No. 22 (1993) on freedom of thought, conscience and religion, concerning the right not to be compelled to reveal one’s thoughts or adherence to a religion or belief in public. It should also introduce legislation to prohibit discrimination in access to schools on the grounds of religion, belief or other status, and ensure that there are diverse school types and curriculum options available throughout the State party to meet the needs of minority faith or non-faith children. It should further amend section 37 (1) of the Employment Equality Act in a way that bars all forms of discrimination in employment in the fields of education and health”.

 

So CSCS asks why the proposed referendums to be conducted in 2015 are not addressing this issue?

http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CCPR%2fC%2fIRL%2fCO%2f4&Lang=en